rTMS for Depression, Anxiety, ADHD, Insomnia and Dementia

At Team Health Care Clinic, we are pleased to introduce an innovative, drug free, noninvasive treatment best known for depression: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS).  rTMS is an FDA cleared device for treatment of depression but has also been shown to be beneficial for ADHD, anxiety, insomnia, some forms of dementia, and other brain related disorders.

rTMS treatments are not painful and patients can read or watch TV during their treatments.  Patients can resume their normal activities following their treatment as the worst side effect may be a mild headache.  These are even rare.

Depression

This is in sharp contrast to electroconvulsive therapy and medication management where symptoms are potentially significant such as weight gain, sexual dysfunction, cognitive impairment and many others.

How does it work?

rTMS is a medical grade magnet that is used to balance the speed of abnormal operating nerves in the brain.  The magnet sends a signal that can be varied to stimulate or slow down the nerves in specific regions.  For example:

rTMS FOR DEPRESSION

Scientists expect brains to fire at is 15-20 pulses per second (pps) in the left frontal lobe.  Patients with mild depression will fire at 10-12pps and below 10pps in more severe cases.  In these cases, we will stimulate the brain with rTMS to fire at a normal frequency.

rTMS FOR ANXIETY

Normally, the left side of the brain fires at a higher frequency than the right side.  When this pattern reverses and the right brain works at a higher frequency, the individual often exhibits symptoms of anxiety.  In this case, the brain would be balanced by stimulating the speed of the left side of the brain or slowing the speed of the right side.

rTMS FOR OTHER CONDITIONS

rTMS can be used to improve abnormal frequencies in the brain, either stimulating or quieting it, to treat a wide variety of conditions.

In order to get the most precisely directed and successful treatment, you should consider the following:

  1. Request only EEG guided rTMS

Patients should request their provider measure the frequency of firing of the entire brain with a 19-lead electroencephalogram, or EEG.  An EEG measures the function of the brain like and EKG measures the function of the heart.  Without this information, a provider is making recommendations based on a patient’s history alone.  With the information discovered from the EEG, a provider can give precise rTMS treatment to the specific unbalanced region of the brain. No guesswork!

  1. Not all rTMS units are equal

Some rTMS units can only treat at 10pps frequency and are consequently limited in the conditions it can successfully treat.  Find providers that are using a state of the art unit that can vary its frequency of stimulation from 1 to 20pps.  This allows the provider to treat a wide variety of conditions beside depression.

  1. Evaluate Brain Chemistry

Find providers that evaluate brain chemistry including blood glucose, neurotransmitter deficiency, brain-gut connections, gluten sensitivity and many other factors.

 

If you suffer with depression, anxiety, insomnia, ADHD and other brain related disorders, I would encourage you to explore rTMS as a highly successful, low risk solution for qualified candidates.  In our clinic, we determine your candidacy by starting with an examination, including an EEG.

Tiffany Watson, CNP

Tiffany Watson, CNP

 

Is My Brain Degenerating?

People often ask me, “How do I know if my brain is degenerating?” At Team Health Care Clinic, we take the health of the brain as seriously, if not more, than any other aspect of the body and of one’s health. In many areas of our body, pain will help indicate when something is wrong. Pain is not the primary means of how the brain exhibits dysfunction and thus it shows up in other ways. Common signs of brain degeneration include depression or fatigue as a result of brain-related activity, such as reading or driving. Even when these signs aren’t apparent, degeneration may still be occurring.

Having a better understanding of what each part of the brain does leads to a better understanding of what degeneration of that area may look like.

Where does brain degeneration occur?

Let’s review the two most common regions that we see degeneration in the brain occurring in our practice.

Frontal Lobe

The frontal lobe sits behind the forehead and is the largest lobe of the brain. This area of the brain is what separates humans from other animals, as it gives us personality. It allows us to suppress impulses such as violent tendencies and socially unacceptable behavior, and provides emotional drive, planning, and motivation. It is also the area that is developmentally delayed in those with ADD/ADHD. When this area becomes impaired due to degenerative changes, depression, laziness, inability to control impulses, poor judgment and social behavior, and mental sluggishness may arise.

Cerebellum

The cerebellum is the “little brain” that sits off of the back end of the brain under the base of the skull. When it comes to the function of the cerebellum it’s easiest to think of a DUI test that a police officer may perform, as alcohol suppresses the cerebellum. The test entails looking at balance, coordination, and spatial awareness. The cerebellum receives information from eyes, muscles, and the inner ears to calibrate proper movements, and allowing us to know where we are in space. Do you struggle with frequent episodes of dizziness or vertigo? Have poor balance? Easily carsick? Or have subtle shakes at the end of hand or finger movements? These may be early signs that your cerebellum is degenerating.

Identifying early signs of brain degeneration

It is crucial that your medical provider can look for and identify these early signs of an aging brain. In our medical system, most physicians aren’t trained on how to identify and manage early stages of brain degeneration until it has progressed beyond the point of return. For example, Parkinson’s disease often isn’t identified until someone has a resting tremor. In contrast,  chronic constipation, loss of smell, or slowness of movement may be an early sign of the disease. By the time symptoms such as a tremor are present, the disease has progressed enough that little can be done functionally to address the severity of the condition and focus changes to prevention of further progression. This is why being aware of the early warning signs of brain degeneration is critical.

Here at Team Health Care Clinic, we utilize in depth neurological exams, Interactive Metronome, BTrackS Balance Plate assessments, lab tests, and at times Neurofeedback as part of our neurological work ups to assess the brain health of our patients. If you or anyone you know may be suffering from the changes mentioned in this blog, don’t wait! Call our office today for a free consultation.

Erik Starr, DC